Book Review: ‘The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight’ by Jennifer E. Smith

November 12, 2015     Holly     Reviews

Book Review: ‘The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight’ by Jennifer E. SmithThe Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight by Jennifer E. Smith
Published by Poppy on January 2, 2012
Genres: Young Adult, Contemporary, Romance
Pages: 236
Format: eBook, Kindle Edition
Source: Purchased
Goodreads
4 Stars

Four minutes changes everything.

Hadley Sullivan, 17, misses her flight at JFK airport, is late to her father's second wedding in London with never-met stepmother. Hadley meets the perfect boy. Oliver is British, sits in her row. A long night on the plane passes in a blink, but the two lose track in arrival chaos. Can fate bring them together again?

Unlike my first experience with Jennifer E. Smith, I really enjoyed reading The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight. It has everything you could want in a novel – European travel, chance meetings at an airport, cute boys with even cuter accents. It’s just a fluffy novel full of all sorts of feel good.

As some of you will note, I wasn’t a huge fan of Smith’s Hello, Goodbye, and Everything In Between, so going into The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight had me a little leery. I was worried that the same issues that plagued me with Hello – annoying couples, unnecessary drama, loads of filler – would come into play with this novel. But I was very wrong, and very pleased to be so.

You see, Hadley is the kind of main character I can get behind. A little bit snarky, constantly a step behind everyone else, and so full of life as a character that I couldn’t wait to live inside of her head for the duration of the novel. And I liked that Smith introduced us to some of her less appealing qualities, like her attitude and slight selfishness, from the very beginning when she misses her plane to England. Being unlikable made Hadley that much more trustworthy in my book.

And while, of course, much of the story is about Hadley and Oliver meeting in the airport and playing out the idea of fate and destiny, I actually enjoyed the portions of the novel that explored Hadley’s life outside of Oliver much more than the love story. Watching Hadley and her father interact during the various stages of their relationship during the novel was both eye-opening and deliciously interesting, and at times even a bit heartbreaking. And comparing Hadley’s experiences with her father versus that of Oliver’s was a wonderful comparison that Smith makes in The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight. Without it, I think it would have made Hadley seem much more selfish and stereotypical than she actually is.

But Hadley’s father aside, her interactions with more minor characters like her mother and stepmom, as well as her own self-discovery, set The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight steps ahead of Hello, Goodbye, and Everything In Between. It’s a much more reflective, mature, and thought provoking novel compared to its successor, and it’s something that I think a great deal of people will enjoy if given the chance.

Leave a Reply